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Virginia Tech: Study Skills Self-help Information

Example Web Site and/or Technical Equipment Required

Website: http://ucc.vt.edu/academic_support/study_skills_information.html

Website Example: http://ucc.vt.edu/academic_support/study_skills_information.html

Tech Product Equipment

Computer(s), Internet access, projector (optional)

Activity Description

This site has many good ideas on study skills for your students. It covers everything from note taking, remembering, and how to read a difficult book, to writing term papers. Might be a good place to send students at the beginning of the year

Preparation

  1. Review the list of study skills in the navigation pane on the left.
  2. Decide which you would like to focus on for your students. You may want to start with the "Where does time go?"  activity to help students understand how easy it is to use up their day.
  3. If your students are working independently, you might want to look at the section labeled Online Study Skills Workshops  and have them work through one of the four workshops.

How-To

  1. Start by using the "Where Does Time Go?" exercise.
  2. Discuss time scheduling.
  3. Review Cornell Notes  and demonstrate its use. This note taking method is very effective for adult students since many lost or never had good study habits.

Teacher Tips

  • Review the online workshops. You may want to show them to your students.
  • These resources are excellent. They can be part of a study skills elective class or an introduction to re-entering school for adults.

More Ways

  • Use this site for all the aspects of developing study skills

Select subjects and subcategories

Electives

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OTAN activities are funded by contract CN200091-A2 from the Adult Education Office, in the Career & College Transition Division, California Department of Education, with funds provided through Federal P.L., 105-220, Section 223. However, OTAN content does not necessarily reflect the position of that department or the U.S. Department of Education.